Free Range Nurse

Cooking therapy from a former travel nurse

Bay Scallop (or shrimp, or chicken, or…) Fried Rice February 12, 2011

Filed under: dinner,lunch,seafood — freerangenurse @ 9:13 am

Bay Scallop Fried Rice
I have been eyeing this recipe for fried rice for quite awhile.  I’ve made fried rice before, but it never seemed to come out right.  It always ended up kind of mushy and clumpy and not what I hoped for.  Then I came across a recipe on Steamy Kitchen that also included some helpful hints in making fried rice.  One of the tips was to make the rice a day or two in advance and let it dry out a bit in the fridge.  Then, the problem was I never remembering to make rice a day before I actually wanted to eat it.  Finally, the other day, while I was making fish tacos, I remembered to go ahead and make some rice, too.  Once it cooled, I put it in the fridge to use today.  The results were so much better than my previous tries.  I did make a few changes to the recipe and ran it through the weight watchers points calculator for you.  I calculated the points by dividing the total recipe by 4 servings, but it could easily feed 5 people, depending on how much you eat.

Total weight watchers points for 1/4 recipe is 11.  This is based on scallops.  Naturally, this will vary based on what you use for the protein.

Bay Scallop Fried Rice

adapted from Jaden Hair’s recipe at Steamy Kitchen

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 tsp corn starch
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 10 ounces bay scallops, white muscle removed
  • 3 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil, divided (I use grapeseed, because it has a higher smoke point than canola)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 3 1/2 cups white rice, grains well separated
  • 1 cup sugar snap peas
  • 1/3 cup carrots, julienned
  • 1/2  red bell pepper, julienned
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 3 Tbsp low-sodium soy sauce

In a medium bowl, toss the scallops, salt and cornstarch, let it sit for about 10 minutes at room temperature.  Heat a large wok over high heat.  Once the pan is hot enough for a bead of water to instantly sizzle and evaporate, add 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil and swirl to coat the pan.  Add the scallops, quickly spreading them out around the pan so that they are not overlapping.  Let the scallops sear undisturbed for 30 seconds, then flip them to cook on the other side for another 30 seconds, or so.  Remove the scallops onto a plate and set aside, leaving as much of the oil as possible.  I use a large, round, flat, slotted spoon for this.  Don’t worry if they aren’t cooked all the way through, you’ll finish them up at the end.

Turn the heat down to medium and let the pan heat up again.  Pour in the eggs and stir to scramble.  When the eggs are almost cooked through (they should still be slightly runny in the middle), remove them from the pan onto the same plate as the scallops.

Clean out the wok with a paper towel (I had to wash it as bits of egg were stuck to the bottom) and heat up again over high heat with 1/2 tablespoon cooking oil, swirling it around the pan.  Sauté the sugar snap peas for about a minute until crisp and bright green, remove to plate.  Add remaining oil and let the wok heat up again, then add the rice, quickly spreading the grains around the wok’s surface, then leave them there, undisturbed until you hear the grains sizzle, about 1-2 minutes.  Use the spatula to toss the rice, again spreading the rice out over the surface of the wok.

Drizzle the soy sauce all around the rice and toss.  Add the red pepper and carrots and toss.  Let the rice sizzle again, then add the scallops, egg and peas back to the pan along with the sesame oil.  Toss to mix the rice with the other ingredients, then let everything sit and get hot again.  The rice grains should get so hot, they practically dance!  Taste and add additional soy sauce, if needed.  Enjoy!!

Note:  Additional tips for fried rice success from Steamy Kitchen

  1. Use previously chilled leftover rice
  2. High heat is essential in cooking fried rice
  3. Fry ingredients separately, or they will all taste the same
  4. In order to properly fry rice, you have to leave it alone and allow it to get hot enough.  Otherwise, the grains break and release more starch, resulting in clumpy, sticky rice.
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